Random Rantings and Ravings from a Slow-Poke Runner in the Heart of the South. (A Weeekly (sort of) Blog about running and just about anything else)

Tuesday, October 31, 2006

20 miles!!

WHEW!!

20 miles!!!!

So THAT is what it feels like!

I feel like I have entered into the “big boy” miles now! Those 20 miles were NOT easy! I am not sure why, but 20 miles seemed a few notches more difficult than the 18 I completed two weeks ago.

I started off the morning with 2/3 of a powerbar and packed three gels into my camelbak that was full of water. Due to a combination of weather and oversleeping, I was not able to run as much last week, logging only 12 miles during the week. That may be the contributor to my sluggish feeling as I started the run, a sluggish feeling that never quite went away.

I used the google pedometer to map out the route. It is essentially the same route as usual with extensions to meet the distance. I mapped out a small loop in a side neighborhood and it turned out it had a couple of nice gradual hills to run through. The weather was in the mid 40’s when I started. I was dressed perfectly for those temperatures but later in the run (3 ½ hours later) I was burning up!

I was not worrying about pace but, at 10 miles, I was disapointed that I was running about 10:24 a mile. I had not paid any attention and had not wanted to run over a 10-minute mile. I knew that I did not need to try to pick up the pace at that point because I was not really feeling up to it.

After about 2 ½ hours, the miles seemed to be passing more slowly. Partially, I was just bored. Three hours is a long time to be out pounding a road. At about 15 miles my route took me past my neighborhood. I had a tempting thought to just turn right and end my run early. I quickly dismissed it from my mind.

Three miles later, my route took me by my house for a 2 miles loop through the neighborhood to complete the run. At this point I was just hanging on. Quitting was not an option but pace was no concern. I had to keep reminding myself of the short distance left when my wife drove slowly by on her way to church and encouraged me.

I took off my camelbak and gave it to my wife. I told her I was struggling to finish the last mile and she stayed with me and talked me through it. It was a big help and I did make it! 20 miles! It felt like it too! I finished the run in 3:35:58, with a pace of 10:48 per mile. I came into the house, showered and got dressed, and made it to Sunday School before the teacher had started the lesson.

If I had any grandeur thoughts of a fantastic time for the marathon, they were squelched from my mind this weekend. This marathon will be about finishing. Future marathons may include talk of time goals but this one is just about going the distance. In two weeks, I will find out what 22 miles feels like!!!

Happy Halloween!

7 Comments:

Blogger Jim said...

Wow! Congratulations on getting to the "big boy" miles as you would say. The thing about the big boy miles is that if you keep running like that, you'll just become a smaller boy. Something we all strive for.

I liked you line "Quitting was not an option but pace was no concern. ". I need to take on that philosphy. Can't wait to hear about the 22 miler!

5:00 AM

 
Blogger PLANET3RRY said...

Great work on your run, that is awesome. 20 miles, it's a strange distance... sorta like turning 21... a little different, a big milestone, but you still feel the same, well, a little.

I'll be interested to hear about how you feel about 22 miles. Don't worry about pace. Even if you know you are faster than your pace dictates, the pace will come with experience. Your mind hasn't been to this distance and all the standard literature tell you that you are going to be very fatigued for that long of a run... mind slows you down, self preservation.

Just use The Force and remember, there is no wall... and if it is, it's at mile 50, not mile 20

12:10 PM

 
Blogger Phil said...

Shane... you reached another significant running milestone. I really liked the way you just keep pushing ahead when the doubts cropped up. Don't be too worried about how well this run correlates with you marathon performance. I suspect that you had a lot more in you. The next time you try this push the pace up a little. You'll be on your feet far less time and put a lot less stress on your body.

Also, next time, bag the camel-back. They're great for hiking, they suck for running. You don't need to be caring around all that extra weight especially over 20 miles. Compute a course with shorter loops, perhaps 5 miles, that loop back to a common point. Set yourself up with 3 or 4 Gatorade bottles (12 oz) at the common point in your run. Each time you pass the point, drop an empty and pick up a fresh bottle. Also, by using shorter loops, you'll break up the run into managable sections.

Good luck with your 22 miler.

6:18 PM

 
Anonymous LLOYD BURTON said...

WOW - WHAT A GREAT FEAT! THERE ARE NO WALLS - FOR YOU - BUT I HIT A WALL LAST NIGHT WHEN I PAINTED OUR WOODWORK FOR 4 HOURS - AND LAY IN BED IN PAIN FOR AN HOUR AFTERWARD.
WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU - I'VE BEEN CALLING YOU THE THIN-MAN! HOPE THAT IS OK - THERE USED TO BE A TV SHOW BY THAT NAME - PROBABLY BEFORE YOUR TIME. LOVE YOU-ALL - BE CAREFUL AND BE SAFE-ETHAN AND MORGAN'S PAPA

5:06 PM

 
Blogger Rick said...

I walked around downtown Pontotoc today. Probably about 1/2 mile, breathing hard when I got back to the car (it was after lunch at Boondocks, #1 Daughter & I went for a walk). It wore me out. Shut up.

Your Bro'

Rick

(oh, and congrats on hitting 20 miles)

12:31 PM

 
Anonymous leonard said...

Shane YOU ARE THE MAN!
Awesome job on making it to the big two oh. If I had one "do over" before I completed the marathon, it would have been great to bust 20 a couple of times. Sounds like you're on the way.
I expect on race day you'll have enough adrenaline that you’ll have to fight to keep your pace slow.
I have to disagree with Phil on the Camelback. I would't use it race day, but I sure wouldn’t give it up on the long runs untill then. Phil may have the willpower to loop by his house 4 or 5 times and not stop in to see what’s going on, but I like the idea of big loops so there’s no chance or returning without covering the distance (even if it means walking forever). Keep the Camelback… besides, it will add that much more speed to your run when you’re free of it (race day).
Thanks for the props on your blog. Can’t say that I’ve been on the blog enough to be an inspiration, but I appreciate you thinking of me.
Cover the distance, and the pace will take care of itself.
Congrats again. Hope to see you (from the stands) on race day!

1:17 PM

 
Blogger Phil said...

Shane .. are you still blogging. You have this great 20 mile run and then go silent. What's happening in your world?

10:40 PM

 

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